HOW TO HAVE ‘FUN’ WITH A NEW CAMERA.

I’ve been an avid fan of the Nikon camera system since the early 1970’s and I’ve still got every Nikon camera and sense I have ever bought.

My first Nikon digital SLR was the D100 which I’ve since had converted to Infra Red with great  success.

The D100 was followed by the D200, D300, then a leap to the full frame D700, followed by the D800 and now the D810.

The D800 and D810 with their 36mp capacity producing large images with fantastic resolution.

Of course, with any new camera purchase I get the urge, finances permitting(read She Who Must be Obeyed) to add the latest lens as well.

Now all this great gear has one significant drawback for a photographer of advancing years and that is weight, of the cameras, not the photographer.

Without boring you with loads of detail, suffice to say that my D810 with my largest lens attached weighs in at a shade over nine pounds. The following image has a lighter lens attached but it’s still quite heavy.

Carrying that monster all day and hand holding it when shutter speed permits can be quite a strain.

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THE D810 WITH 70-200MM F2.8 LENS

 

A year or so ago I treated myself to a little Leica Dlux 6. It’s the ants pants of small digital cameras, shoots RAW, has Aperture and Shutter Speed priorities together with all the bells and whistles you can imagine from the Leica stable.

It’s light weight, fits in a pocket and produces great images, colour saturation second to none and its ergonomics are great. Did I mention its lightness.  I’ll mention it again, it’s really light and  Oh yes, it makes great images too.

 

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THE LEICA DLUX-6

I was really impressed with the little Leica and I began to research the Leica brand. Unfortunately for me, Leica DSLR’s and their lenses are far, far beyond the reach of my photography  budget.

However, all was not lost. I discovered that Panasonic produce a range of small cameras carrying lenses by Leica, algorithms by Leica and apart from some cosmetic changes, camera bodies by Leica.

The Panasonic models don’t display the red Leica circle but instead have an inconspicuous silver ‘L’displayed on the camera body.

I know it’s difficult to comprehend but two of the Panasonics have joined my collection. Firstly, it was the Panasonic DMC-LX 100.

 

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THE PANASONIC LUMIX LX100. NOTE THE SMALL L ON THE LOWER LEFT OF THE BODY.

This camera is another little ripper. It’s only drawback is the f8 aperture limit. That’s compensated for by the f1.7 aperture available at the wide end and like its Leica brother has a full range of controls available..

I just can’t speak highly enough about this little beauty. It’s served me well and has enabled me to produce some really great images.

The LX 100 is such a great thing that I felt compelled to recently purchase what Panasonic describe as their ‘Travel Camera.’

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THE PANASONIC LUMIX DMC-TZ110

This little beauty has an optical lens rage of 25-250mm and a maximum f stop of 2.8. Again, it’s light as a feather and similarly has full manual, aperture, shutter speed and all the other controls you would expect from a Leica based camera.

This is how the three tiny tots look sitting together.

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THREE LITTLE ONES ALL IN A ROW. ALL PHOTOGRAPHED TO SCALE WITH, DARE I SAY IT, THE NIKON D810 WITH ITS 24-70MM F2.8 LENS.

To say I’m having fun with my new camera is an understatement. I had a local printer copy the TZ110’s instruction manual that I’d downloaded from Panasonic. Copy authorised of course.

It’s a steep learning curve. The instruction manual runs to exactly 406 double sided A4 pages. Thank heavens there is no exam before using the camera.

My brain is definitely in top gear as I try to unravel the operating system and commit to memory the vital info required to get the best out of my ‘travel camera.’

As soon as I’ve produced some reasonable images you can expect to be deluged with the results.

This is a two edged sword. All my reading on the ageing process tells me that I have to exercise my brain on a daily basis. I’m not sure if this instruction manual will do the trick but I reckon that by the time i’ve reached the 80 year level I’ll know for sure.

Hoo roo for now

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9 thoughts on “HOW TO HAVE ‘FUN’ WITH A NEW CAMERA.

    1. I hope so Greg, at the moment it’s a brain twister coming to grips with the touch screen, multi levelled menus and hidden tricks. I’ll keep you posted.

  1. Now that’s I funny thing! I have gone exactly the same way Bones, I still have my Nikon DSLR, but now mostly use a Panasonic Lumix just like you; the little fella is a great camera especially when I’m of on a road trip!

  2. Thank you for your interesting words.
    I think Cannon and Nikon have great cameras and lenses, but for most of people, these little gems are a much more realistic alternative. Although not reaching the possibilities of big brands, weight and quality are taken into account.

  3. Spot on. All of my contract work is done with the Nikons. I think clients would give me the colds shoulder if I turned up with a point and shoot.

  4. I’ve only ever had a point and shoot and hardly use that anymore as my samsung galaxy note 4 has an amazing camera. Having said that I love photography and am thinking of getting my first ‘proper’ camera. I just don’t know where to start though. Great insightful post – thanks!

  5. There are so many brand options for photographers these days. Nikon and Canon dominate the full size DSLR market but Panasonic, Sony and a few others offer cameras that make wonderfull images and are respected by professionals and experienced amateurs.

    May I suggest that before you dive in at the deep end have a yarn with a couple specialist camera dealers and outline your intended use of your dream new camera. They can offer great advice that you will not receive from say Harvey Norman or any other large multi produce retailer.

    There are numerous web review sites too, DP Review, Thom Hogan.com. Ken Rockwell.com and a host of others, plus many more on line courses, the majority of which are free.

    I rely on Digital Camera Warehouse for most of my purchases, I’ve no commercial arrangement with them, I’m just another customer but they are reliable, prices most competitive and all of their products are from Australian suppliers and are therefore fully guaranteed and warranted. No grey imports.
    Their mail order system is second to none. Not sure if they have an outlet in the Sunshine State.

    Have fun with your search. It will be interesting to learn of your decisions.

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