SOME TYPICAL AUSTRALIAN LANDSCAPES.

Recently a friend in Canada nominated me to post seven ‘nature’ photographs over period to seven days on Facebook.

Part of the deal was that in addition to posting the images, I had to nominate seven other unsuspecting photographers to do exactly the same thing.

I agreed but immediately struck my first hurdle. As a Facebook virgin I had no idea how to ‘tag’ my nominees nor how to correctly place my posts on my timeline.

That prompted my Canadian mate to take on the role as my Facebook coach. I think I’m still a bit of a disappointment to him but ‘them’s the breaks’ as the saying goes.

Now on the photographic front, ‘Nature’ images include Landscapes and Wildlife and I noted that landscapes were the images of choice for this assignment.

Accordingly I followed suite and here below are the landscapes I submitted.

DSC_0082 copy 2This is the dry river bed of the Finke River in the bottom end of the Northern Territory. When it occasionally runs it  carries an enormous volume of water. Some wag put this kids bicycle frame in the sand near the crossing’s wheel tracks. It certainly adds perspective.

sculpture _DSC0111 copy 1  This image was taken at sunset at the sculpture monuments on a hilltop outside Broken Hill in the far west of New South Wales. The sculptures dominate the skyline of this arid plains landscape.

DSC_0169 copy3 copyThis NSW police speed warning sign looks totally out of place on this outback stretch of track just over the Queensland/New South Wales border on the approach to the tiny outback  town of Tibooburra in far west New South Wales.

hills 001 copy2Here my friends are looking across the Snowy Mountain range from near the summit of Australia’s highest mountain, Mt Kosciusko, 7,310 feet or 2228m metres. Not high by international mountain heights but we love it all the same. The fact that Kossi as we call it is in New South Wales, my home State make it all the better.

20130630_Lake George_0008 copy 1Lake George nestles between the hills along the Federal Highway between Canberra, our Nation’s Capital and Goulburn, my home town. In places, the lake abuts the highway and it was from one of those spots I made this image. The wind farm on the range across the lake is one of the largest in the State and is still a little controversial because of its dominance of the skyline.

THE WEIR IN INFRA RED copy 2Some years ago I had my old Nikon D100 SLR converted by Life Pixel Infrared of Mukilteo, WA, in the USA, to only make infra red images. This IR image of the Marsden Weir on the Wollondilly River just down the hill from my house gives an interesting touch to this landscape.

darling at bourke for tafe copy 1This image is of the Darling River at North Bourke in far west New South Wales. The Darling is the mightiest river in the State and flows in a south westerly direction to finally join with the mighty Murray River at Wentworth in New South Wales. When taken together these two mighty rivers rank at number 4 of the worlds longest river systems.

I know the preceding image is final image required but I could’t resist throwing in the following one of the Murray River near Nuriootpa in South Australia. Comparing both rivers, the Darling appears to be the healthier of the two.

IMG_1592 copy 1

Hoo roo for now.

 

TREES

It’s a constant source of amazement to me how totally unrelated events can coincide, resulting in a further event of a like nature.

Today is one of those days. Not having created a new blog for a few days I was scratching my head for a subject as I read other blogs that had recently arrived.

Firstly, I came across Temasek Garden’s response to Cee’s Black and White Challenge. Pekebun had chosen ‘Trees,’ for her response.

Then I remembered that my camera club’s challenge for September is, wait for it, ‘Trees!’

To that end I’ve been ‘tree’ hunting for the competition where the image limit is six per member, three in the print category and three in the projected image category.

Eureka, a subject for today’s blog, thus bringing three unrelated events to a conclusion.

Luckily where I live, trees are an abundant part of the natural environment. Most of our streets are tree lined and the town is fortunate to have two tree lined rivers nearby. Actually, the Wollondilly River bisects town and is only a few hundred yards from my front door.

So, I only had to go for a short walk to get five of my images and the sixth is from the banks of the Darling River, many hundreds of miles from home.

The Darling River by the way is the third longest river in Australia. It is 1,472klms (915 miles) long and traverses some of the most arid areas of my home State, New South Wales.

Geography lesson over, back to my images for September’s comp:

STANDING ALONE ON A WIND SWEPT HILL NEAR HOME.
STANDING ALONE ON A WIND SWEPT HILL NEAR HOME.
ON THE BANKS OF THE WOLLONDILLY RIVER JUST NEAR HOME. INFRA RED IMAGE.
ON THE BANKS OF THE WOLLONDILLY RIVER JUST NEAR HOME. INFRA RED IMAGE.
LOOKING OVER THE WOLLONDILLY RIVER NEAR HOME. INFRA RED IMAGE.
LOOKING OVER THE WOLLONDILLY RIVER NEAR HOME. INFRA RED IMAGE.
AN OLD MAN ON THE BANKS OF THE DARLING RIVER NEAR BOURKE, NSW.
AN OLD MAN ON THE BANKS OF THE DARLING RIVER NEAR BOURKE, NSW.
AUTUMN LEAVES ON THE ROADSIDE OUTSIDE HOME.
AUTUMN LEAVES ON THE ROADSIDE OUTSIDE HOME.
AN AVENUE OF TREES IN A ROADSIDE PARK NEAR HOME.
AN AVENUE OF TREES IN A ROADSIDE PARK NEAR HOME.

The infra red images were made with my Nikon D100 converted to only make infra red images.