SOME TYPICAL AUSTRALIAN LANDSCAPES.

Recently a friend in Canada nominated me to post seven ‘nature’ photographs over period to seven days on Facebook.

Part of the deal was that in addition to posting the images, I had to nominate seven other unsuspecting photographers to do exactly the same thing.

I agreed but immediately struck my first hurdle. As a Facebook virgin I had no idea how to ‘tag’ my nominees nor how to correctly place my posts on my timeline.

That prompted my Canadian mate to take on the role as my Facebook coach. I think I’m still a bit of a disappointment to him but ‘them’s the breaks’ as the saying goes.

Now on the photographic front, ‘Nature’ images include Landscapes and Wildlife and I noted that landscapes were the images of choice for this assignment.

Accordingly I followed suite and here below are the landscapes I submitted.

DSC_0082 copy 2This is the dry river bed of the Finke River in the bottom end of the Northern Territory. When it occasionally runs it  carries an enormous volume of water. Some wag put this kids bicycle frame in the sand near the crossing’s wheel tracks. It certainly adds perspective.

sculpture _DSC0111 copy 1  This image was taken at sunset at the sculpture monuments on a hilltop outside Broken Hill in the far west of New South Wales. The sculptures dominate the skyline of this arid plains landscape.

DSC_0169 copy3 copyThis NSW police speed warning sign looks totally out of place on this outback stretch of track just over the Queensland/New South Wales border on the approach to the tiny outback  town of Tibooburra in far west New South Wales.

hills 001 copy2Here my friends are looking across the Snowy Mountain range from near the summit of Australia’s highest mountain, Mt Kosciusko, 7,310 feet or 2228m metres. Not high by international mountain heights but we love it all the same. The fact that Kossi as we call it is in New South Wales, my home State make it all the better.

20130630_Lake George_0008 copy 1Lake George nestles between the hills along the Federal Highway between Canberra, our Nation’s Capital and Goulburn, my home town. In places, the lake abuts the highway and it was from one of those spots I made this image. The wind farm on the range across the lake is one of the largest in the State and is still a little controversial because of its dominance of the skyline.

THE WEIR IN INFRA RED copy 2Some years ago I had my old Nikon D100 SLR converted by Life Pixel Infrared of Mukilteo, WA, in the USA, to only make infra red images. This IR image of the Marsden Weir on the Wollondilly River just down the hill from my house gives an interesting touch to this landscape.

darling at bourke for tafe copy 1This image is of the Darling River at North Bourke in far west New South Wales. The Darling is the mightiest river in the State and flows in a south westerly direction to finally join with the mighty Murray River at Wentworth in New South Wales. When taken together these two mighty rivers rank at number 4 of the worlds longest river systems.

I know the preceding image is final image required but I could’t resist throwing in the following one of the Murray River near Nuriootpa in South Australia. Comparing both rivers, the Darling appears to be the healthier of the two.

IMG_1592 copy 1

Hoo roo for now.

 

9 thoughts on “SOME TYPICAL AUSTRALIAN LANDSCAPES.

  1. Great harbour, beaches, interesting industrial sites and a whole lot more.Glad you enjoyed your stay there. You must show us some of your images one day.

  2. Nature has always been close to my heart and i can’t help mentioning that i just LOVED this post.

    The one of the Darling River looks picture perfect.
    Btw, on the 2nd picture – I just read an elaborate post on Australia Outback and how to navigate the great stretch – felt as if a lot of caution is required to traverse it.

    Australia is an awesome country, as you have been reading on my site too 🙂

  3. You are absolutely right. Careful preparations are required. After rain,many outback dirt roads are impassable and are closed until they dry out. Isolation is another issue to contend with, sometimes only one or two vehicles a week use some of the roads( read tracks really). I have an HF radio built into the Landrover. This radio has a range of over 4,000klms on some frequencies. It is good insurance and safer than a sat phone. The best advice is always let people know where you are going and the route you intend to take. Calling in to police stations and letting the staff know where you are off to is also a great safety move.
    By the way, I’m glad you liked the Darling River image. It’s one of my favourites.

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